Discussion:
Kabakians: does anyone remember.....
(too old to reply)
s***@gmail.com
2012-12-07 02:19:30 UTC
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Looks like even those people who REMEMBER Kabakian's are dying out, this thread is OLD.
Hans Klager
2012-12-07 05:43:14 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Looks like even those people who REMEMBER Kabakian's are dying
out, this thread is OLD.
I remember Kabakian's a truly unique restaurant.
--
It is through disobedience that progress has been made, through
disobedience and through rebellion. - Oscar Wilde
a***@mcvprevention.org
2013-07-24 15:08:09 UTC
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Kabakians was on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, where the mall is now.
Armenian/Lebanese cuisine.
Hand-calligraphed menus.
Upholstered table tops, with linen table cloths on top. Wine glasses
would lean dangerously if you place them too close to the edge.
The maitre de waxed both his mustasche, and his eyebrows, and would
insult his guests most elegantly.
The waiter would personally feed the first bite of each dish to the women
in the party, and scold those who didn't clean their plates.
There were dishes like "Queen Xenobia's Fingers". There was a free,
unannounced dessert of some kind of middle-eastern pumpkin, grown in a
home garden, with ice cream on top.
The 80-year old busboy who would bring coffee, flirt with the women, and
his hands would shake in a terrifying manner as he served this coffee;
you would fear for your lap.
They moved out to Foothill for a while; does anyone know what happened?
Does anyone remember?
-Roger
I was taken to Kabakian's as a child of ten or so, and will never forget being fed by the old gentlemen. My parents were very amused and loved it. I thought the food was great!
Hans Klager
2013-07-25 20:51:59 UTC
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On Wed, 24 Jul 2013 08:08:09 -0700 (PDT),
Post by a***@mcvprevention.org
Kabakians was on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, where the
mall is now.
Armenian/Lebanese cuisine.
They moved out to Foothill for a while; does anyone know what
happened? Does anyone remember?
I was taken to Kabakian's as a child of ten or so, and will
never forget being fed by the old gentlemen. My parents were
very amused and loved it. I thought the food was great!
The Kabakian brothers retired. They will always be
missed.
--
"If you have done nothing wrong, comrade, you have nothing to
fear." - Lavrenti Beria, Stalin's head of the NKVD, the secret police.
s***@gmail.com
2013-09-28 20:05:03 UTC
Permalink
Two of the bothers were Haig and Nercess. I'm blocking on the third. Wonderful lines they came out with. Our favorite was one used on a diner who hesitated over the desert. Haig told him sternly, "Nobody doesn't like honey!" Old as they were, they would bake early every morning at something like 5 a.m. and keep the restaurant open until after 10 p.m. They were unique.
Hans Klager
2013-09-28 22:32:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by s***@gmail.com
Two of the bothers were Haig and Nercess. I'm blocking on the
third. Wonderful lines they came out with. Our favorite was one
used on a diner who hesitated over the desert. Haig told him
sternly, "Nobody doesn't like honey!" Old as they were, they
would bake early every morning at something like 5 a.m. and keep
the restaurant open until after 10 p.m. They were unique.
When Kabakians were in their heyday, the foodie movement
was in its infancy. People thought the Velvet Turtle, Chasens,
the Luau and Scandia were the pinnacle of good eating - Yuch!

So, if you wanted a good dinner, served and cooked by
eccentrics, Kabakians was the place.
--
Wall Street, all by itself, orchestrated the crisis by a web of deceit that
was breathtaking. - Michael Lewis on the 2008 crisis.
Librarian
2013-11-01 00:23:31 UTC
Permalink
Check out the Los Angeles Public Library's menu archivefor a blast from the past:

goo.gl/3WG02r

check out that calligraphy!
Kabakians was on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, where the mall is now.
Armenian/Lebanese cuisine.
Hand-calligraphed menus.
Upholstered table tops, with linen table cloths on top. Wine glasses
would lean dangerously if you place them too close to the edge.
The maitre de waxed both his mustasche, and his eyebrows, and would
insult his guests most elegantly.
The waiter would personally feed the first bite of each dish to the women
in the party, and scold those who didn't clean their plates.
There were dishes like "Queen Xenobia's Fingers". There was a free,
unannounced dessert of some kind of middle-eastern pumpkin, grown in a
home garden, with ice cream on top.
The 80-year old busboy who would bring coffee, flirt with the women, and
his hands would shake in a terrifying manner as he served this coffee;
you would fear for your lap.
They moved out to Foothill for a while; does anyone know what happened?
Does anyone remember?
-Roger
Julian Macassey
2013-11-01 17:38:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Librarian
Check out the Los Angeles Public Library's menu archivefor a
goo.gl/3WG02r
check out that calligraphy!
Some wonderful copper plate caligraphy.

Thanks for posting this.


--
"They: The makers of the Constitution: conferred, as against the government,
the right to be let alone -- the most comprehensive of rights and the right
most valued by civilized men." - Justice Louis D. Brandeis
s***@gmail.com
2014-07-21 19:17:53 UTC
Permalink
Kabakian's was my fav restaurant in the area. Their mother was French and taught them how to cook, so we thought of the food they served as French-Armenian. The Kabakian kebab was fabulous. They lost their lease to the church next door on Colo. Ave., and moved to another location on Foothill. That lease was lost within a year, and that was the end of Kabakian's. I talked to the youngest brother as he wrapped the wine glasses to move out. He was bitter, saying "they don't want us here." I doubt that it had anything to do with them. The landlord of the mid-rise S&L building needed a different sort of tenant, and would have to free up the first floor Kabakian's inhabited. A sad loss. From my many visits to dine, I learned quite a lot about "the shuffling Kabakian brothers" and their history. I'm pretty sure all three are deceased now.
Julian Macassey
2014-07-23 03:12:29 UTC
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On Mon, 21 Jul 2014 12:17:53 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com
Note: Google in there ever continuing destruction of the net, have made
their usenet app write with no word wrap. They have been told, but they
don't care. Fuck Goggle.
Post by s***@gmail.com
Kabakian's was my fav restaurant in the area. Their mother was French
and taught them how to cook, so we thought of the food they served as
French-Armenian. The Kabakian kebab was fabulous. They lost their
lease to the church next door on Colo. Ave., and moved to another
location on Foothill. That lease was lost within a year, and that was
the end of Kabakian's. I talked to the youngest brother as he wrapped
the wine glasses to move out. He was bitter, saying "they don't want
us here." I doubt that it had anything to do with them. The landlord
of the mid-rise S&L building needed a different sort of tenant, and
would have to free up the first floor Kabakian's inhabited. A sad
loss. From my many visits to dine, I learned quite a lot about "the
shuffling Kabakian brothers" and their history. I'm pretty sure all
three are deceased now.
They were a terrific restaurant.

`
--
The Internet is full of people who can’t read and want to talk
about sandwiches - Noam Chomsky, Oct 2013
m***@aol.com
2014-07-22 15:29:01 UTC
Permalink
Kabakians was on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, where the mall is now.
Armenian/Lebanese cuisine.
Hand-calligraphed menus.
Upholstered table tops, with linen table cloths on top. Wine glasses
would lean dangerously if you place them too close to the edge.
The maitre de waxed both his mustasche, and his eyebrows, and would
insult his guests most elegantly.
The waiter would personally feed the first bite of each dish to the women
in the party, and scold those who didn't clean their plates.
There were dishes like "Queen Xenobia's Fingers". There was a free,
unannounced dessert of some kind of middle-eastern pumpkin, grown in a
home garden, with ice cream on top.
The 80-year old busboy who would bring coffee, flirt with the women, and
his hands would shake in a terrifying manner as he served this coffee;
you would fear for your lap.
They moved out to Foothill for a while; does anyone know what happened?
Does anyone remember?
-Roger
Yes, Roger, I used to go there frequently. It was located just east of Los Robles, close to where the present mall is now.

I drove for Yellow Cab in the 70's, and would periodically pick up food from their home on E. California Blvd. and transport it to their restaurant in the trunk of my cab.

Two men would come out of the house carrying the food, and then motion to me to open the trunk of my cab. This whole operation was done without one word ever being spoken. I guess they didn't have to, since it was all prearranged with the cab company....but still kind of weird, I thought.

I remember when they opened up the door to their house, the fantastic aroma of the food that was being prepared inside was the best I've ever smelled in my whole life.

You're right about them feeding you the first bite, but they tried to do it to everyone in our party, men and women both...I would always decline, though.

I accidentally found your post, as I was thinking about the restaurant today after all these years, and doing a Google search to find out what happened to it.

Thanks for bringing back some old memories of this great restaurant.

Howard
g***@gmail.com
2015-11-07 18:54:03 UTC
Permalink
Kabakians was on Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, where the mall is now.
Armenian/Lebanese cuisine.
Hand-calligraphed menus.
Upholstered table tops, with linen table cloths on top. Wine glasses
would lean dangerously if you place them too close to the edge.
The maitre de waxed both his mustasche, and his eyebrows, and would
insult his guests most elegantly.
The waiter would personally feed the first bite of each dish to the women
in the party, and scold those who didn't clean their plates.
There were dishes like "Queen Xenobia's Fingers". There was a free,
unannounced dessert of some kind of middle-eastern pumpkin, grown in a
home garden, with ice cream on top.
The 80-year old busboy who would bring coffee, flirt with the women, and
his hands would shake in a terrifying manner as he served this coffee;
you would fear for your lap.
They moved out to Foothill for a while; does anyone know what happened?
Does anyone remember?
-Roger
I went there regularly in 1970 as a Caltech postdoc. It was not very popular, but was a great place. Once we asked to be served in a hurry as we had something else on. They were almost mortally insulted and just plonked each dish down on the table. The next day we gave them a bottle of brandy to make up and we were good friends again.

Ian Glass, Cape Town
b***@aol.com
2016-06-14 01:01:45 UTC
Permalink
I remember the place well. I figured they closed as the brothers died off one at a time. Burger Continental was another favorite. I think the proprietor was named Harry. Their small courtyard was a great place to eat and lounge away the evening.
e***@gmail.com
2016-08-23 02:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Kabakian's was legendary. My large group of friends ate there frequently in the 1970s. I have craved their food for decades ... the Queen Shaharazad kebob. Local lore was that they were Cordon Bleu graduates. The brothers would shuffle between tables and demonstrate how to eat their kabobs especially to the ladies. One night they offered to comp our dinner if the ladies danced for them. Horn dogs. They were jampacked on weekends. I recall driving home between soup and salad to leave a note on the door for friends. Didn't miss a thing. They had a candy shop next door and gave us dark chocolate covered crystalized ginger. I still think of them fondly and never had such amazing food since.
e***@gmail.com
2016-08-23 02:43:36 UTC
Permalink
Kabakian's was legendary. My large group of friends ate there frequently in the 1970s. I have craved their food for decades ... the Queen Shaharazad kebob. Local lore was that they were Cordon Bleu graduates. The brothers would shuffle between tables and demonstrate how to eat their kabobs especially to the ladies. One night they offered to comp our dinner if the ladies danced for them. Horn dogs. They were jampacked on weekends. I recall driving home between soup and salad to leave a note on the door for friends. Didn't miss a thing. They had a candy shop next door and gave us dark chocolate covered crystalized ginger. I still think of them fondly and never had such amazing food since.
Julian Macassey
2016-08-23 03:44:47 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 22 Aug 2016 19:43:36 -0700 (PDT), ***@gmail.com
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

They had a candy shop next door and gave us dark chocolate
covered crystalized ginger.

They introduced me to chocolate covered candied orange
peel. Now I make it at home.

In the heyday of the Kabakians, there weren't many decent
restaurants around. The Velvet Turtle and Monty's were considered
haute cuisine. Theings have got better over the decades.
--
In a time of universal deceit, telling the truth is a revolutionary act.
- George Orwell
g***@gmail.com
2016-11-29 09:12:38 UTC
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Back in the Mid-1970's we would come up from Long Beach State (now CSULB) to the Dorthy Chandler Pavilion for performances and then go up to Pasadena to Kabakians for amazing Lebanese Armenian Food -- we had Kofta, and braised Lamb ribs, and veal in pomegranite sauce, and Dolmas in grape leaves... in it's day Kabakains was amazing.

If you missed it -- you will need to go to festival sponsored by your local Armenian Orthodox Church... find one I Glendale or Bakersfield... but do find one and enjoy the food.
e***@gmail.com
2016-08-23 02:43:38 UTC
Permalink
Kabakian's was legendary. My large group of friends ate there frequently in the 1970s. I have craved their food for decades ... the Queen Shaharazad kebob. Local lore was that they were Cordon Bleu graduates. The brothers would shuffle between tables and demonstrate how to eat their kabobs especially to the ladies. One night they offered to comp our dinner if the ladies danced for them. Horn dogs. They were jampacked on weekends. I recall driving home between soup and salad to leave a note on the door for friends. Didn't miss a thing. They had a candy shop next door and gave us dark chocolate covered crystalized ginger. I still think of them fondly and never had such amazing food since.
h***@gmail.com
2018-02-06 05:05:30 UTC
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I remember Kabakians. We used to go there when I was little..ages 7-9. I lost my first tooth on their steak! The brothers always fed me and my sister our first bites, and then would take us to pick out a dessert if we cleaned our plates. I've tried to find a recipe for that yogurt sauce for years...it is ingrained in my mind. I've yet to figure it out, but I'll never stop trying. Kabakians is legendary,so grateful I was lucky enough to enjoy it!
Julian Macassey
2018-02-06 07:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by h***@gmail.com
I remember Kabakians. We used to go there when I was
little..ages 7-9. I lost my first tooth on their steak! The
brothers always fed me and my sister our first bites, and then
would take us to pick out a dessert if we cleaned our plates.
I've tried to find a recipe for that yogurt sauce for
years...it is ingrained in my mind. I've yet to figure it out,
but I'll never stop trying. Kabakians is legendary,so grateful
I was lucky enough to enjoy it!
We all remember Kabakians.
--
Hipsters have ruined everything. - Tim May April 5 2014
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